Save on Pinterest

The Best Herbs for Your Health

Add fresh flavor and vibrant color to your cooking with the best herbs for your health.

1 / 10
A bunch of fresh organic dill on a black vintage rustic background, tied with green twine and kitchen scissors. Freshly cut greens. Maryna Iaroshenko/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Dill

Stay healthy this winter by adding more dill to your diet. Salmon with Creamy Dill Sauce is a tasty place to start. Studies have found that dill has antimicrobial properties and can stop the growth of certain types of bacteria that lead to illness.

2 / 10
Bunch of fresh organic parsley on a cutting board on a wooden table, selective focus, rustic styleOlgaLepeshkina/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Parsley

This humble herb has more to offer than just garnish (try these Simple Lemon Parsley Potatoes this week). Parsley is rich in vitamins that may help to slow the growth of cancer cells and is known to reduce blood pressure.

3 / 10
Fresh lemongrass on wooden texture in cooking concept. toeytoey2530/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Lemongrass

Having a stressful week? Slow down with a cup of lemongrass tea; it’s been proven to ease anxiety and promote relaxation. Lemongrass also adds a lemon-ginger flavor to light dinners like this Thai Shrimp Soup.

4 / 10
Fresh green basil on the wooden table, selective focusOcsanaDen/Getty Images Plus

Basil

Each summer our gardens overflow with basil and, as it turns out, loads of nutrients and health benefits. This sweet herb has been found to reduce inflammation and can ease symptoms of the common cold. Next time you feel one coming on, whip up this classic pesto to keep the sniffles at bay, and try these other foods that help stop a cold, too.

5 / 10
Rosemary bound on a wooden table Muenz/Stock/Getty Images Plus

Rosemary

Stock up on fresh rosemary to improve your heart health; it can prevent damage to blood vessels that leads to heart disease. Rosemary has a strong flavor perfect for hearty meat-and-potato dishes like this Roasted Chicken with Rosemary.

6 / 10
Fresh mint growing. Focus on front leaves. kokopopsdave/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Peppermint

Mindlessly scrolling instead of tackling your to-do list? Brew some fresh mint tea to improve focus and lift your mood. Peppermint can also ease IBS symptoms and relieve nausea. Try cooking with this feel-good herb and make Couscous Tabbouleh with Fresh Mint & Feta.

7 / 10
Nettle tea in glass. Fresh and dry nettle.MKucova/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Stinging Nettle

When you’re planning to cook with fresh herbs, stinging nettle probably doesn’t make your grocery list. This lesser-known herb is due for a comeback, though. It’s been found to reduce inflammation and pain from arthritis, as well as give you shiny, healthy hair. Just be sure to wear gloves when you handle fresh-picked stinging nettle. The name is no joke!

8 / 10
Chopped green onion in a wooden plate. On dark rustic backgroundOlesia Shadrina/Getty Images

Chives

Calling all baked potato fans! That delish green herb on top of your sour cream is more than a topping. Chives have been linked to lowering your risk of gastric cancer. Try sprinkling them on meat, salads or Chive Crab Cakes.

9 / 10
Dry Bay Leaves - Laurel Tree leaves, aromatic herb and Indian spices on the wooden spoon, rustic background, macro.joannatkaczuk/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Bay Leaf

Ever wonder why chicken noodle soup always makes you feel better? It may be the bay leaf! This soup staple contains oil that relieves sinus pressure and pain and may even boost your immune system.

Here’s why just about every soup recipe calls for bay leaf.

10 / 10
Raw Organic Red Dandelion Greens Ready to Chopbhofack2/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Dandelion

If you’ve never tried cooking with dandelion leaves, maybe it’s time to give them a go. Start with this easy and tasty dandelion salad or brew a cup of dandelion tea. This herb aids digestion and can improve bladder and liver function.

Learn more about cooking with herbs with our ultimate guide.

Carrie Madormo, RN
Now a freelance health and food writer, Carrie worked as a nurse for over a decade. When she isn't hunched over her laptop with a baby in hand, you will find her cooking her grandmother’s recipes, lacing up her running shoes or sipping coffee in the bathroom to hide from her three young children.